Prime Minister Justin Trudeau recognized the importance of remembering the Nanjing Massacre

On November 28, 2018, MP Jenny Kwan’s motion for establishing December 13 as the Nanjing Massacre Commemorative Day did not have the unanimous support in the Parliament required for it to be carried, but Prime Minister Justin Trudeau clearly recognized the need to remember the history.

 

He said:

    Mr. Speaker, of course we deplore the horrific events that took place in Nanjing 80 years ago. All Canadians can agree that the loss of life and violence that so many civilians faced should never be forgotten. We will never forget those terrible acts. The memory of these victims and survivors must be addressed in the true spirit of reconciliation.
— It was significant that a head of the state of a third country (neither Japan nor China)  recognized the history of Nanjing Massacre and the importance of remembering it.
— At the preceding press conference, Tomoe Otsuki, a member of Japanese Canadians Supporting the Nanjing Massacre Commemorative Day, read a version of the below statement.

 

We Canadians should embrace the Nanjing Massacre Commemorative Day

I am a member of Japanese Canadians Supporting Nanjing Massacre Commemorative Day (nanjingmemory2018.wordpress.com). We are a group of Japanese Canadians across Canada, including some prominent Japanese Canadians who experienced WWII internment, university professors, students, teachers, doctors, artists, organic farmers, peace activists, etc.

We support MP Jenny Kwan’s proposal for the national memorialization of December 13 as a day to remember the Nanjing Massacre, one of the worst war crimes of human history, in which hundreds of thousands of Chinese civilians and POWs were massacred and tens of thousands of women and girls were raped (many of them killed immediately after, to erase the crime) by the Imperial Japanese Army troops. The atrocities occurred over the course of several months in late 1937 and early 1938 in the city of Nanjing and surrounding farming villages. The Nanjing Massacre is a well-researched and documented historical fact, which was registered in the UNESCO Memory of the World in 2015. The Japanese government officially recognizes the history too, though insufficiently.

The Canadian Parliament has recognized five genocides that happened outside of Canada: the Armenian Genocide (1915), the Holodomor (1932-33), the Holocaust (1933-45), the Rwandan Genocide (1994), and the Srebrenica Genocide (1995). In its “Breaking the Silence” section, the Canadian Museum of Human Rights in Winnipeg details these genocides and states, “In Canada, people are free to speak openly about human rights abuses. Canadians used this freedom to draw attention to acts of extreme violence and inhumanities around the world. Concerned Canadians have influenced Parliament to recognize five mass atrocities as genocides – deliberate systematic attempts to destroy specific ethnic, racial, religious or national groups. Through such official recognition, Canada speaks out as a nation. It exposes and condemns horrific crimes that have been hidden, minimized, or denied.” We fully concur with this statement.

Last December 13, the Ontario legislature passed a motion to designate December 13 as the Nanjing Massacre Commemorative Day. It is time that Canada did so on a national basis to provide symbolic recognition of the countless atrocities committed by the Empire of Japan in its imperial quest to conquer the whole Asia-Pacific region from the late 19th century to the mid-20th century.

Some Canadians of Japanese ancestry worry that doing so constitutes bashing and demonizing Japan, but they should remember that the Empire of Japan collapsed at the hands of the Allied Nations, including Canada, in the summer of 1945, and Japan and its people clearly broke away from the dictatorial and repressive Empire by their adoption of the post-war Constitution of Japan with its pacifist and democratic principles. Remembering atrocities of the Empire of Japan is not demonizing current Japan or its people. The five genocides and other atrocities remembered by Canadians have not caused racial conflict or resulted with demonizing of Canadians with ancestry in the countries that once perpetrated those crimes.

Of course, we Canadians need to recognize past and ongoing human rights violations within Canada, and although we still have a long way to go, Canada has tried to redress the past wrongs such as the residential school system for indigenous children, the internment of Ukrainian Canadians during WWI and of Japanese Canadians during WWII, the Head Tax on Chinese immigrants, the inhuman treatment of Indian migrants on Komagata Maru, and the ongoing injustices exemplified by the missing indigenous women and victims of human trafficking. Our need to address unresolved human rights issues in Canada does not preclude the need for Canadians to recognize those outside of Canada. Whether in the past or present, whether inside or outside of Canada, human rights violations are for all us to study and remember so that we will not let them happen again.

(End)

See also Jenny Kwan’s report of the day on her Facebook.

 

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Articles in Vancouver Shinpo and Fraser Monthly

Satoko Oka Norimatsu, a member of Japanese Canadians Supporting Nanjing Massacre Commemorative Day, published two articles simultaneously, in Fraser Monthly (November Edition) and weekly Vancouver Shinpo (November 1 Edition) that circulate mostly among the Japanese-speaking immigrants in Greater Vancouver.

Here are images of the articles and summaries of the main points in English.

Fraser Monthly

Fraser Nov 2018 1

 

Fraser Nov 2018 2

Title: Facing the History — Regarding Nanjing Massacre Commemorative Day

  • As I started the group JCs Supporting NMCD, there have been critical voices against me in the local Japanese newspapers.
  • On September 19, a rally called “Wake Up Foreign Ministry! Nanjing Massacre Did Not Happen!” was held in Tokyo, and even there, one of the conservative members of the Parliament who spoke at the event singled me (and another colleague) out.
  • Nanjing Massacre is an unshakable historical fact. Hundreds of thousands of Chinese civilians and POWs were massacred and tens of thousands of women and girls were raped (many of them killed immediately after, to erase the crime) by the Imperial Japanese Army troops.
  • Even Japanese government admits this history, though insufficiently (lack of referral to mass POW killings and rape of women). However, for those who want to deny the history, even this limited recognition by the Japanese government seems dissatisfying. This is why a meeting like above is held, and the fact that current members of the Japanese Parliament attended and gave a talk at such an event truly disheartens me.
  • Since there is so much denialist narrative going around in the public media and on the Internet, it is increasingly difficult for Japanese language users to learn about this history. So I introduce some of the reliable material here. (Introduction of books by Tokushi Kasahara, and other Japanese historians and journalists including Tamaki Matsuoka, diaries of then witnesses of the Massacre, Minnie Vaultrin and John Rabe, both of which have been translated into Japanese.)
  • Back in 1980s, I attended Lester B. Pearson College in Victoria for two years. There, I learned for the first time in my life about the war atrocities of Imperial Japan from my Asian friends from the Philippines, Singapore, Indonesia, etc.
  • I fully understand that it is very difficult for one to learn the past wrong of one’s own country. I even understand the wishful thinking that it would be easier if this history was a lie. It took me a long time to come to terms with this history.
  • But now, thinking back, this experience set a foundation within myself for the work that I do now — work for peace with fellow Asian colleagues.
  • In Germany, children learn about the Holocaust, and with the whole country honestly facing the history,  it has become a responsible member of the international community. I want Japan to be such a country too.
  • Just as we remember the Hiroshima and Nagasaki memorial days in August, even in Canada, it is important for us to remember the Nanjing Massacre in December as well.
  • We are planning to hold a gathering to remember the victims of the Nanjing Massacre on December 11, in Downtown Vancouver. Details TBA. Anyone is welcome.

Vancouver Shinpo 

Vancouver Shinpo Nov 1 2018 .jpgVancouver Shinpo Nov 1 2018 _01 small

Title: Denial of the History of Nanjing Massacre is Unacceptable

  • As I formed the group Japanese Canadians Supporting Nanjing Massacre Commemorative Day, there has been increasing criticism against me on the Internet and Japanese language papers.
  • On September 19, a meeting with the theme “Nanjing Massacre Did Not Happen” was held in Tokyo, and there too, a member of Parliament pointed at me
    and another colleague as Japanese supporters of the NMCD.
  • I think there can be a variety of opinions about establishing NMCD in Canada. However, it seems that not a few people within the opposition movement against NMCD deny the history itself, and this is not acceptable.
  • Nanjing Massacre is an unshakable historical fact.  The Japanese government (Ministry of Foreign Affairs) admits it on their web page, though insufficiently.
  • The Japanese official report of 2010 to conclude the Japan-China joint historical research commissioned in 2006 by then Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (in the dawn of the first Abe Administration), clearly states, “there were cases of both mass and individual killings by Japanese soldiers of prisoners, stragglers, soldiers in civilian clothing, and some ordinary citizens, and there were also many cases of rape, pillage, and arson. The number of victims of massacre by the Japanese forces was said to be over 200,000 at the International Military Tribunal for the Far East (over 100,000 in the sentence against commander Matsui) and over 300,000 at the 1947 Nanjing War Crimes Tribunal; the current Chinese view is based on the latter tribunal. Research by the Japanese side, by contrast, has come up with a variety of estimates, such as 40,000 and 20,000, with 200,000 as the highest estimate. Behind these differing estimates of the number of victims lie differences with respect to the definition of ‘massacre’ (illegal killing), the geographical area and time span involved, and the results of inspection of written materials, such as burial records and population statistics.” (See English version HERE.)
  • Japanese Canadians account for about 1% of the total Canadian population. Among them, Japanese speakers are an even smaller minority. This NMCD is a Canadian issue, so I propose we use Canada’s official languages to discuss this issue, not just Japanese.
  • I am particularly concerned with the anonymous attacks against me using the oppressive language. We need to have respect in discussing this issue.
  • In July, I visited the Canadian Museum for Human Rights in Winnipeg. Its “Breaking the Silence” section allows visitors to learn about the five genocides that happened outside of Canada, which Canada’s Parliament has recognized (the Ukrainian Holodomor, the Armenian Genocide, the Holocaust, the Rwandan Genocide and the Srebrenica Genocide in Bosnia).  It states, “In Canada, people are free to speak openly about human rights abuses. Canadians used this freedom to draw attention to acts of extreme violence and inhumanities around the world. Concerned Canadians have influenced Parliament to recognize five mass atrocities as genocides – deliberate systematic attempts to destroy specific ethnic, racial, religious or national groups. Through such official recognition, Canada speaks out as a nation. It exposes and condemns horrific crimes that have been hidden, minimized, or denied.”
  • This museum of course emphasizes human rights violations within Canada, such as those against Indigenous Peoples and Japanese Canadians.
  • It is only natural that the historical memory of Canada, which tends to focus on the “West,” now pivots towards East Asia, as immigration from that part of the world increases.
  • On December 11, a group of Japanese Canadians will hold an event to mourn the victims of the Nanjing Massacre in Downtown Vancouver. Details TBA. All are welcome.

 

— A interview with Satoko Oka Norimatsu appeared in the November 7 edition of Sintao Daily. Link: https://goo.gl/RfJDGj 

Joy Kogawa’s statement of support for Nanjing Massacre Commemorative Day

Here is from author Joy Kogawa, a member of the Japanese Canadians Supporting Nanjing Massacre Commemorative Day.

joy kogawa
Joy Kogawa 

I support MP Jenny Kwan’s motion for a Nanjing Massacre Day for the following reasons:

 

  1. Large-scale atrocities in Asia’s history need to be widely known and studied so that they are not repeated. A Nanjing massacre day will serve as an educational tool for this insufficiently known aspect of world history.  Whereas the Holocaust in Europe is taught and remembered, the same cannot be said for Asia’s history.

 

  1. In an age of increasing xenophobia and historical revisionism, when even the victims of the Holocaust can once more be openly mocked, Jenny Kwan’s motion assumes a new urgency to align ourselves with the world’s historians and to guard against revisionists, equivocators and deniers of history who attempt to falsify and sanitize the past. Our humanity depends on recognizing our capacity for barbarity.

 

  1. Canada’s multicultural population is a model of civility for which we are celebrated. This was amply demonstrated during the Japanese Canadian struggle for redress when many ethnic communities stood with us. Such support encourages relationships of goodwill. Lack of support and opposition to Jenny Kwan’s motion portends antagonism towards Japanese Canadians and divisiveness between Chinese and Japanese Canadians.

 

  1. Reconciliation between Japan and Japan’s victims requires a full country-wide acknowledgement in Japan of the harm done. Identifying with those who suffer, hearing their truths, expressing grief and offering forms of restitution holds the hope of alleviating suffering. Denying or attempting to diminish or ignore the pain prolongs and adds to the wrong. Those who choose to be silent and remain by-standers are participants in the on-going wrong, offering comfort to perpetrators and increasing the dangers of repeating history.

 

  1. The passing of Jenny Kwan’s motion sends a message of encouragement to those few courageous educators in Japan in their struggle for truth in history. The young people of Japan deserve to learn their history at home rather than facing the shock of learning it abroad.

 

  1. The support given to Japanese Canadians by other ethnic communities assisted us to achieve a full parliamentary acknowledgement of the harm. The success of Japanese Canadian redress has become a model of truth and reconciliation. I hope Canada’s support of Jenny Kwan’s motion will assist the struggle for a full parliamentary acknowledgement in Japan of the harm and will lead to truth and reconciliation throughout Asia.

 

  1. I long for Japan to be counted among the countries of the world that demonstrate high moral leadership and hope that passing Jenny Kwan’s motion will act as a spur in that direction.

 

Submitted to the NAJC by Joy Kogawa.

MP Jenny Kwan’s media release July 6

Here is MP Jenny Kwan’s media release on July 6, after the press conference.

Media Release
6.7.2018

Nanjing Massacre Commemoration Facilitates Reconciliation
Multi-cultural Community Express Support for MP Jenny Kwan’s Initiative

In the Nanjing Massacre, an estimated 20,000 to 80,000 Chinese women and girls were raped and some 300,000 people were killed. Western eyewitnesses in Nanjing described the atrocities as “Hell on Earth”.

MP Jenny Kwan is advocating for the federal government to commemorate the Nanjing Massacre. “While the prosecution of sexual violence employed in conflict as a political act is a relatively recent phenomenon, its enactment is not. Large-scale, systemic utilization of sexual violence has been used throughout history as intentional, deliberate tactics to assert power, dominance and to dehumanize the opponent and attack their identity. This type of violence falls outside military needs and adds tremendous cruelty and suffering to already violent conflicts”, said Kwan.

“In the spirit of ‘never again’, I called on the government to establish December 13 every year as Nanjing Massacre Commemorative Day. Victims of sexual violence should never be forgotten”, added Kwan.

MP Jenny Kwan first learned about the Nanjing Massacre at a photo exhibition in her late twenties when she was a councillor in the City of Vancouver. The images of this “Forgotten Holocaust” had a lasting impact for Kwan. At the time, she wondered why there was no mention of these atrocities in any of the history books when she was in school. As a provincial cabinet minister, Kwan helped ensure that educational resource on human rights in the Asia-Pacific (1931-1945) is available in the B.C. education curriculum. That was the first education resource guide written from the perspective of social responsible and global citizenship on the WWII in Asia. Since that time, this B.C. resource has been adopted by other provinces and different states in the U.S.A.

Kwan is grateful that her call for action has received support from people of different cultural backgrounds. Gathering at the press conference include Canadians from the Japanese, Korean and Filipino community as well as a Dutch descent of WWII victim and former Global TV Beijing Bureau Chief and Canada ALPHA co-chair.

Japanese Canadians across Canada have formed a group – Japanese Canadians Supporting Nanjing Massacre Commemorative Day. Its group member includes renowned author Joy Kogawa and past president of National Association of Japanese Canadian Grace Thomson. Satoko Norimatsu is the spokesperson for the group and she is also the founder of Peace Philosophy Centre.

Norimatsu noted: “Canada was an active participant of the World War II in both the European and Asian Theatres, and one would never bring oneself to say that, for example, the Japanese military’s abuse of over 1,600 Canadian POWs from the Battle of Hong Kong did not matter because it happened outside of Canada. Everything that happened during WWII matters to all Canadians. We Canadians do memorialize important historical events that happened outside of Canada. In 2003, the Canadian Government passed a bill establishing a National Holocaust Memorial Day. Every August, citizens of cities across Canada commemorate the atomic-bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. It is simply shameful of those associated with victimizer countries to aggressively oppose the memorialization of the past wrong of those countries. Such opposition is naturally regarded as an act of nationalistically-motivated history denial. The history of Nanjing Massacre is officially recognized by the Japanese government, although insufficiently, and we, Japanese Canadians Supporting Nanjing Massacre Commemorative Day, are united in resisting against any move within Canada and beyond, which denies the history and opposes its memorialization. This is not about Japan-bashing or demonizing. It’s about remembering the victims of the past and committing ourselves to ensuring that history does not repeat itself. ”

Also in support of this initiative are representatives from the Korean Senior Citizens of Greater Vancouver. Recently at the Parents Day celebration, hundreds of Korean Canadians signed the petition to call for the declaration of December 13 of each year as Nanjing Massacre Commemorative Day. Vice President Dr. Bong-Hwan Kim stated: “The effects of sexual violence echo across generations, through trauma, stigma, poverty, and poor health. The world we live in today continues to be haunted by conflict, militarism, and the senseless loss of human lives through warfare. Reconciliation requires remembering, teaching, commemoration of history and education.”

Augusta Lokhorst, a descendent of Imperial Japanese concentration camp victim in the Dutch East Indies said, “The commemoration is important to my mother and the victims of the WWII atrocities. It validates the significance of their suffering. To truly honour their experiences, we need to ensure that future generations know about this history as well.”

Over the course of the Second World War, an estimated 200,000 women and girls from China, Korea, Japan, Burma, Indonesia, the Philippines, and other occupied territories in Asia were tricked, kidnapped, or coerced into working in brothels to serve as “comfort women”.

The Canada-Philippines Solidarity for Human Rights joins the call for action and noted that the removal of the comfort women statues in Manila simply adds insult on thousands of victims of sex slavery during the Japanese Imperial Army’s occupation of the Philippines in WWII. “Reconciliation cannot be achieved if efforts are made to erase painful chapters of history. Historical revisionism should not be allowed”, said Erie Maestro.

Co-chair of Canada ALPHA, Thekla Lit has been working on the humanity education of the WWII in Asia since 1997. “During World War II, the Imperial Japanese Forces committed war crimes throughout the Asia-Pacific. The Nanjing Massacre stands out because of the organized nature and sheer scale of looting, slaughtering, and raping. Unlike many other atrocities committed by the Imperial Japanese Forces, the Nanjing Massacre was also widely reported, shocking many across the world at the time. It now stands as a symbol of the devastation and brutality sowed by the Imperial Japanese Forces wherever they marched. In essence, this commemoration is for all victims of the Asian Holocaust, not simply victims of the Nanjing Massacre,” said Lit.

Journalist Paul Johnson, Director of the documentary Unit 731 – How America Exploited Japan’s Biological Weapons Crimes said, “The war crimes committed against innocent Chinese civilians before and during World War II are among the least understood and recognized atrocities of modern history. Preserving the stories of these victims is critical to reconciliation in East Asia and for the spread of peace and justice everywhere.”

People are invited to sign the Nanjing Massacre Commemorative Day petition through Kwan’s website – http://www.jennykwanndp.ca <http://www.jennykwanndp.ca/>.

Japanese Canadians Supporting Nanjing Massacre Commemorative Day makes a statement at multi-cultural press conference in Vancouver

Satoko Oka Norimatsu spoke on behalf of Japanese Canadians Supporting Nanjing Massacre Commemorative Day, at the multicultural press conference held in Vancouver on Friday July 6 (10:30 AM, at Korean Senior Citizens’ Society, 1320 E Hastings) with MP Jenny Kwan and members from the Filipino, Korean, Chinese Canadian communities and others. 

 

July 6, 2018

 

My name is Satoko Oka Norimatsu. Today, I am speaking on behalf of the Japanese Canadians Supporting Nanjing Massacre Commemorative Day. We are a group of Japanese-Canadians from Montreal, Quebec to Victoria, BC who think it is only natural that we recognize the history of the Nanjing Massacre and support its memorialization in Canada. Our group includes Joy Kogawa, author, and Grace Thomson, former President of the National Association of Japanese Canadians, university professors, school teachers, students, doctors, artists, business people, peace activists, organic farmers, and so on.

 

Two weeks ago, on June 24, former prime minister of Japan Yasuo Fukuda visited the Nanjing Massacre Memorial Museum, and reportedly said, “Japanese people should come here and learn about the history.” He is the fourth former prime minister to have visited the museum in Nanjing, and his visit was welcomed by China.

 

This year is the 40th anniversary of the 1978 Treaty of Peace and Friendship between China and Japan, and we believe Fukuda’s visit to Nanjing reaffirms the principle that reconciliation is only possible with sincere recognition of truths.

 

Some people argue that because the Nanjing Massacre happened outside of Canada, it has nothing to do with Canada. We think they are wrong.

 

For one, Canada was an active participant in World War II in both the European and Asian theatres, and no one would ever dare to say, for example, that the Japanese military’s abuse of over 1,600 Canadian POWs from the Battle of Hong Kong did not matter because it happened outside of Canada. Everything that happened during WWII matters to all Canadians.

 

Secondly, we Canadians do memorialize important historical events that happened outside of Canada.

In 2003, the Canadian Government passed a bill establishing a National Holocaust Memorial Day. Also, every August, citizens of cities across Canada commemorate the atomic-bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The Mayor of the City of Vancouver reads out the Hiroshima Day Proclamation.

 

We also believe that people with Japanese ancestry opposing the Nanjing Massacre Commemorative Day is tantamount to German Canadians opposing memorialization of Holocaust victims, or American Canadians opposing monuments and events that commemorate victims of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic-bombings.

 

I think it is simply shameful that those associated with victimizer countries aggressively oppose the memorialization of the past wrongs committed by these countries. Such opposition is naturally regarded as nationalistically-motivated history denial. In fact, the opposition group called Japanese Canadian Coalition for Ethnic Unity, refers to the Nanjing Massacre as “something that is supposed to have happened 80 years ago in China.” Their statement, published in a local Japanese language newspaper, even casts doubt over the history itself.

 

Our group definitely defies the claim that ALL Japanese-Canadians oppose Nanjing Massacre Commemorative Day. The history of the Nanjing Massacre is officially recognized by the Japanese government, although insufficiently, and we, Japanese Canadians Supporting Nanjing Massacre Commemorative Day, are united in resisting any move within Canada and beyond that would deny the history and oppose its memorialization.

 

Some people also argue that this is about Japan-bashing or demonizing Japan, and again, this notion is wrong. “The Nanjing Massacre” refers to atrocities committed by the Imperial Japanese Forces. The current nation of Japan and its people clearly broke away with the Empire of Japan and its militaristic, dictatorial, and undemocratic governance when Japan, in 1946, adopted the post-war “Constitution of Japan,” of which the three major principles are war renunciation, people’s sovereignty, and human rights. By talking about the Nanjing Massacre, we are not talking about modern Japan or its people.

 

Again, by talking about the Holocaust, we are not demonizing people with German ancestry. By talking about Hiroshima and Nagasaki, we are not bashing people associated with the United States. By talking about the histories such as Indian Residential Schools and the war-time internment of Japanese Canadians, we are neither demonizing Canadians, ourselves, nor our government. These are all universal human rights issues that should be shared and remembered by all. These are all histories that everybody should learn so that they are never repeated.

 

We believe, as seen in the example of former Prime Minister Fukuda’s visit to Nanjing, that active memorialization of the Nanjing Massacre by people with Japanese ancestry will only garner respect not only from people with Chinese ancestry, but from people of all other backgrounds. We believe that Japanese Canadians joining hands with other Canadians in support of Nanjing Massacre Commemorative Day will be a true embodiment of our Canadian values, which include respecting diversity and honouring the collective history of all ethnic communities in the country.

 

Satoko Oka Norimatsu

Japanese Canadians Supporting Nanjing Massacre Commemorative Day

https://nanjingmemory2018.wordpress.com/

email: nanjingmemorial2018@gmail.com

Satoko Oka Norimatsu is a Vancouver-based journalist, who writes on political and historical issues in the Asia-Pacific Region. She is co-author of Resistant Islands: Okinawa Confronts Japan and the United States (Rowman and Littlefield, 2nd Edition, 2018), and her latest publication in Japanese is Okinawa wa koritsu shite inai  [Okinawa Is Not Alone] , (Kinyobi, 2018). She is an Editor of Asia-Pacific Journal: Japan Focus, Founder and Director of Peace Philosophy Centre, Co-Chair of Vancouver Save Article 9, a member of Article 9 Canada.

We are a group of Japanese Canadians and we support Nanjing Massacre Commemorative Day in Canada.

In May, 2018, we started a new group “Japanese Canadians Supporting Nanjing Massacre Commemorative Day.” We are a group of Japanese Canadians across the country, from Montreal to Victoria, who support memorialization of Nanjing Massacre in Canada. If you consider yourself a Japanese Canadian and would like to join us, please use the contact form to the left, to contact us. You can also email us: nanjingmemorial2018@gmail.com. We protect members’ privacy and do not disclose names of the members. 

Here is a brief history of how we got here so far.

At the end of 2016, Soo Wong, a member of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario tabled Bill 79, an “Act to proclaim the Nanjing Massacre Commemorative Day.” As the bill had been stalled in the legislature (perhaps partly because of the opposition from the Japanese government, and history denialists and Japanese nationalists inside and outside Ontario), Wong introduced a motion recognizing December 13 as Nanjing Massacre Commemorative Day in Ontario. The motion passed unanimously on December 26, 2017, in time for the 80th anniversary of the massacre.

See:

Some Japanese Canadians protested National Association of Japanese Canadians’ opposition against Bill 79. 

Here is a letter from Japanese Canadians to Ontario’s premier in support of Bill 79. 

Why I Support the Nanjing Massacre Commemorative Day Act: Joy Kogawa 

Ontario Has A Moral Obligation To Remember The Nanjing Massacre

 

On November 30, 2017, Member of Canada’s Parliament (House of Commons) Jenny Kwan, made a remark on the 80th anniversary of Nanjing Massacre.

In the spring of 2018, Kwan started a petition campaign: Petition to the Government of Canada to Establish Nanjing Massacre Commemorative Day.

See:

Canadian lawmaker re-appeals for establishing Nanjing Massacre Commemorative Day

Jenny Kwan: It’s time for Canada to finally acknowledge the horror of the Nanjing Massacre

On June 1, Kwan held a press conference in Toronto, in which Yusuke Tanaka, a member of Japanese Canadians Supporting Nanjing Massacre Commemorative Day spoke.

Here is Yusuke’s speech text (Click to enlarge).

 

 

On June 18, Jenny Kwan attended the graduation ceremony of Vancouver Japanese Language School. Here is her speech.

 

We will provide more information on this blog.

Thank you,

JCs Supporting NMCD